“Everest and Blizzards” By Annie Tang

I see you there, huddling under the snow-laden bush, sheltering from the whiteout. You want to be with your parents, don’t you? I see you there, hungry for warmth. But you won’t get that from me, not yet. I will let my winds and weather test you first. So for now, bear my heartless cold.

This was just supposed to be a fun ski trip in the Alps. Both of my parents were Olympic skiers and had met at the Winter Olympics. I’ve lived, breathed, and eaten the biting cold. My life revolved around snow and skis. Even my name, Everest, was a memento to the towering peaks of the Himalayas. But now, everything is different. My parents are gone. They died in an avalanche while skiing. They loved skiing. It was second to me. I was only saved by a small pine tree which should have fallen, but somehow did not. Coincidentally, I was skiing with my Uncle Andrei when the avalanche hit. Just like my parents, my uncle is gone. I’m now alone, with no hope in sight. A blizzard is raging past me. The little shelter I get from the pine tree is welcome, but not enough. The winds are howling past me. Just me in the vast, empty world. It’s only home to two things, me and the storm. Even now, all I can think is that I’m going to go like my parents did. My uncle is probably dead and I’m next in line. I have never heard of anyone getting out of a situation like this. An avalanche kills without mercy. Even though I lived, I’m going down a painfully chilly and inky path.

What a surprise, you are still breathing. I didn’t think you would last so long. Oh my, look at what we have here, a break in the storm. Not much of a surprise there. I may have gotten to like you, Everest Hunter. You remind me of someone awfully familiar.

It is amazing how much you can appreciate a thick ski jacket. Thanks to it, I didn’t get hypothermia. I still don’t know where my Uncle is. I suspect that he wasn’t nearly as lucky as I was. I’m lucky that a break in the storm happened to come my way. Better get a move on and find a better hide out. Best thing I need is a cave, and if possible, food.

I see you trekking through the snow. I see you wanting a way out. There is no way out, not on my watch, not under my nose, and not in my home. I like you, Everest. I know who you are. Your parents both tried to leave and I think you know the rest. Don’t do what they did, or fate ? no, I should say nature ? will not be on your side.

Leave a Reply